Ways to Support Breast Cancer Awareness in October

Alan Rasof Breast Cancer AwarenessWays to Support Breast Cancer Awareness in October

Every year, the US and other nations commemorate those suffering from, recovering from, and living cured of breast cancer throughout the month of October. Individual people and companies will wear pink to show their support for those with the disease and to raise money for research and treatments for patients. From Yoplait to the National Football League, products and people sport pink for breast cancer awareness and fundraising. If you want to personally support the people suffering from the disease or the families of the patients, here are some ways you can get involved.

Donate directly to a local hospital: A number of exposes have criticized such organizations as Susan G. Komen for spending less than 10% of the money they raise on the patients, victims, and their families. The rest of the money gets tied up in overhead, pink products, and ad campaigns. If you want to ensure that your money goes directly to the people in need, their medications, and their families, talk with your local hospital or oncological clinic and send money to them rather than to a third-party fundraising organization. You can also browse sites like GoFundMe and donate to individuals who are raising money for treatments, travel, and reconstructive surgery.

Talk about detection: Where it’s appropriate and where you’re among trusted friends, have a conversation about self-checks and proper preventative maintenance. In the vast majority of cases, breast cancer is highly treatable when it’s caught early, but catching it early is the trick. People with breasts should be on the lookout the twelve signs of breast cancer, as outlined in this handy infographic from Know Your Lemons.12+signs+of+breast+cancer+using+lemons

Help your family live healthfully: For breast tissue in particular, there are some common practices and behaviors of Americans that directly cause breast cells to function improperly and wreak havoc on the human breast. For example, certain soaps and shampoos that include parabens, which are known to disrupt breast cell reproduction. Similarly, evolutionarily, humans didn’t produce their own hormones for a long time, so breasts are to this day very receptive to any chemical that even mimics estrogen. Unluckily for us, though, plastic is similar enough that breasts absorb plastic molecules, which are well known to cause cancer once allowed into the body. Avoid microwaving in plastic or interacting with much heated plastic, including Keurig cups.

The Susan G. Komen Global Movement

Alan Rasof breast cancer awarenessThe Susan G. Komen Foundation began in 1980, after Nancy Brinker made a promise to her sister, Susan, who was dying from breast cancer. This one promise was that Nancy would do everything she could to end breast cancer for good. 30 years later, this promise has turned into one of the world’s biggest philanthropic accomplishments that has impacted millions of lives.

Nancy began the foundation with just $200 and a list of donor names. Now, the organization has invested in over $2.6 billion in research, community outreach, health advocacy, and various programs that span across more than 30 countries. Breast cancer death rates have decreased by 34% since the foundation’s start.

The Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation has one of the world’s largest network of breast cancer survivors and activists. When Suzy was diagnosed in 1977, breast cancer was not a subject people openly spoke about – women felt like they were alone. But now, after tremendous efforts in the last 30 since the founding of the organization, women know they are not alone. There is now a global community made up of millions of people who are not afraid to share their stories and increase awareness of the disease so that it can one day be a part of the past and not a reality.

Alan Rasof nancy-brinker-1According to the official website for the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, Nancy G. Brinker, Founder and Chair of Global Strategy, has spoken about the rapid growth of the foundation and its effects on patients diagnosed with breast cancer. She writes:

“We have fought for access to care for the poor and uninsured; funded the clinics that educate, screen and treat people with breast cancer; paid for the groceries, transportation, wigs, prosthetics and insurance co-pays to help women face breast cancer with dignity and hope. We are doing this in more than 30 countries around the world, with more to come. We have invested more than $1.7 billion to make these programs possible,” (ww5.komen.org).

The efforts of all of those involved with the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation have gone above and beyond any expectation that Nancy first had when she began the organization.

With continued efforts, this Foundation will flourish among the many profitable nonprofits and help those diagnosed with breast cancer, never ceasing to set out what they originally planned to do – find a cure.