Making a Difference: Cerebral Palsy

Most people are unaware that Cerebral palsy (CP) is actually a term that describes a multitude of disorders, not just one. The word Cerebral refers to issues that deal with the brain, and the word Palsy refers to a person’s ability to maintain balance, posture, and movement.

The main cause of CP is predominantly due to the mother catching an infection or a virus while the fetus is still in utero. These account for 70% of the cases. Some people also attribute it to a lack of oxygen flow to the infant’s brain during labor and delivery, but that is actually a very small percentage.

A child who has CP will show signs early in childhood and they may display floppy limbs, involuntary movements, or exaggerated reflexes, to name just a few. There is no known cure at this time for CP, and most sufferers will require life-long treatment, including physical therapy, medication, and occasional surgery. For many families, these are expensive and emotionally draining times, which is why there are charities to support families who have members with cerebral palsy.

United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) is a non-profit organization that works to help families with cerebral palsy members as well as other disorders. Founded in 1949, they pioneered the idea of using fundraising telethons as a means of support. The Cerebral Palsy Foundation (CPF) is another group that not only supports people, but they do it in a different fashion by partnering with schools and the media. Reaching for the Stars is focused heavily on the science behind CP and working on ways to someday formulate a cure. 

There are also organizations that are determined to ensure adequate rights for those who suffer from disabilities. The American Association of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AAIDD) was founded in 1876. Their main goals are to broaden the ability of businesses to work with individuals who have intellectual and developmental disabilities and to promote and encourage the development of a society that can fully embrace people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

In addition to these support groups, there are numerous others that assist with the neonatal and maternal sector. March of Dimes was founded by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1938. The original aim was to combat polio and it was called the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis. Since funding Jonas Salk’s life-saving polio vaccine, they have steered their focus towards preterm birth-related diseases, as well as other childhood illnesses.